Bespoke Shoes Unlaced – a shoemaker's blog

Sunday, 19 January 2014

Shoemaking Course January 2014 - Days 11 & 12

We can't believe it's already over. This course has really flown by. They've been a lovely group of diligent, conscientious and very hard working students and it has paid off. If the energy levels had been higher they could have been finished by Friday morning.


As it always is with something this intensive, the finishing stages actually took a long time. But it was definitely worth it for the results. Lovely straight edges on the heels, smooth soles and generally well-shaped sole edges.


Hours were spent rasping....

glassing and sanding...


The calm at lunchtime before the final onslaught!
 dyeing, waxing and burnishing...






Cheryl's beautiful natural soles - hope that your husband was impressed with all of your hard work.
 Followed by a few more hours of nourishing the shoemakers...


and the uppers, before buffing the toes to a military shine.


There was even time to go through measuring and fitting up lasts. The fit on all of the shoes was good - even for the non-bespoke lasts - with only small adjustments needed to fill extra space.

And the results? A very happy group with their well-fitting, shiny shoes!
David, Jonathan, Gee, Martin, Cheryl and Rachel
Congratulations guys and we look forward to seeing the next few pairs taking shape. Remember we're only an email away if you need any help or advice! Until next week happy shoemaking!

7 comments:

MADAM CHINO said...

wow, this looks incredible! i'm so inspired that you've taught these people to make such lovely shoes! great work!

jimmyshoe said...

Thanks Madam Chino, you should do the course yourself! Best, jimmyshoe

jgroot said...

Bravo! I am always awed by the determination of the budding craftsmen and -women that you show here. My own abilities are somewhat challenged even by sewing a button onto one of my shirts, so I have the utmost respect for those who embark on such an artisinal odyssée as making a pair of handwelted shoes.

If you will allow me, I have an unrelated question. You, and other shoemakers, frequently use flush fitted metal toe taps to mitigate toe wear. I have a slouchy gait and wear my toes far quicker than the rest of the soles. Unfortunately, the usual practice of my shoemaker (Eastern Europe) is to use nailed-on taps rather than flush fitted ones. I might be able to coax them into trying otherwise, but I don't know if they even have such taps as those used for flush fitting. As you sometimes purvey cordwainer gear, I was wondering if you could tell me where you get yours?

All the best.

Paul D. Mitchell said...

I'd love to have an online shoemaking class. I've already taken several classes and made shoes, but I'm interested in using more of the traditional tools for deals on shoes (for example, I used a belt sander instead of sandpaper when I was working on the soles, but I no longer have access to it) so I'd like to learn how to do more things by hand. I'd also like to focus on sandalmaking because I haven't done a lot of that.

K said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
jimmyshoe said...

jgroot, we could sell you some toe plates if you would like. We have three sizes. Otherwise you have to buy a box of 50 which is quite expensive. Email us if you are interested, cd@carreducker.com
Best, jimmyshoe

jimmyshoe said...

Well, Paul D Mitchell, come and do a class. Details on our website
http://carreducker.com/shoemaking-courses
Choose the city and the course and let us know.
Best, jimmyshoe